Category Archives: Abolitionism

CFRC Prison Radio, May 13, 2020

Updates on COVID-19 behind bars, messages and song requests and tributes from our listeners outside and behind bars, and an interview and discussion about disturbances at Donnacona Institution in Quebec – provided by the John Howard Society.

Prison Radio for April 22, 2020

Messages and words of support, news updates on COVID-19 in Canadian prisons, and recordings from the noise demos and prisoner solidarity caravan – demanding early release for prisoners due to the pandemic – that came through Kingston this week.

New Resource: noprisons.ca

A new website that is serving as a clearing house for all the information you could need about what is going on in Canadian prisons during the COVID-19 pandemic.

CFRC Prison Radio, April 1, 2020

Updates on COVID-19 in federal prisons, including the first diagnosis at Port-Cartier and Grand Valley Institution, musical requests from supporters of prisoners at Bath Institution, transcripts from an interview with the Joyceville Institution inmate committee chair, calls for depopulation and release of prisoners during the pandemic, and information on the Barton Jail, Laval Immigration Detention Centre and Burnside Jail solidarity actions and inmate protests.

Teachin’ Against the Big House: Teach-in on Prison Entertainment.

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September 18, 2019, at 7pm EST CFRC Prison Radio (CPR) will air the audio from Teachin’ Against the Big House: Teach-in on Prison Entertainment. This teach-in took place on September 12, 2019, bringing together voices critical of the Rockin’ The Big House concert to discuss what prison tourism means for Kingston and beyond. It was organized by the P4W Memorial Collective, SNID, and OPIRG Kingston.

Listen to the audio here.

Speakers included professors Justin Piché (University of Ottawa) and Kevin Walby (University of Winnipeg), and formerly-incarcerated activists Richard Atkinson, Ann Hansen, Donny Hogan, and Jimmy Hogan.

Post-PJD Reports, August 14, 2019

Tonight at 7pm on CFRC 101.9 FM our first post-PJD episode. Featuring an interview with Shaun Shannon and Calvin Neufeld at the Evolve Our Prison Farms PJD event in Kingston, a discussion of the Criminalization and Punishment Education Project second quarterly JAIL Hotline report, and PJD events in St. John’s and Hamilton.

Listen to the full episode here: https://archive.org/details/cpraug14

Harsha Walia at De-Carceral Futures, Queen’s University, May 9, 2019

On June 12, 2019, CPR aired part of the keynote address for the De-Carceral Futures: Bridging Prison and Immigration Justice workshop that was held at Queen’s University on May 9-10, 2019.  The keynote featured Harsha Walia, Activist, Researcher and Author of Undoing Border Imperialism: “Migrants are not Criminals: Challenging Movement Carceral Logics that Foreclose Solidarity” and Jonathan Simon, Adrian A. Kragen Professor of Law and Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Society, University of California – Berkeley: “Four Myths of Punitive Immigration Policies: Sovereignty, Discipline, Eugenics, and Broken Windows”.  It was chaired by Stephanie J. Silverman (Chair), Trinity College, University of Toronto.

Listen here: https://archive.org/details/CPRJune121900Prerecord.

This episode also includes updates about solitary confinement and the ongoing controversy over Bill C-83.

CFRC Prison Radio On TVO!

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Why prisoners are tuning in to this campus radio station

Hey wow! A nice write-up about the show from TVO! Much thanks to David Corrigan for interviewing us and seeing the show in action while we were on the air at CFRC 101.9 FM.

“When people are calling in with all their kids on the line, leaving a message for Daddy, and you can hear all the kids in the background yelling at him with their cute Christmas song request or whatever, those are the things that make it worthwhile.”

Violent History of Benevolence

CFRC rebroadcast on May 1st a March 28 panel in Toronto called “Violent History of Benevolence”. This event was part of the monthly OCAP Speakers Series, where we gather to discuss issues that are critical to the success of poor people’s movements.

This event was sponsored by the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty.

Listen to the archive show here.

“Social work is often considered a noble profession.

But writers A.J. Withers and Chris Chapman argue this idea is not only historically inaccurate, but the fiction also allows decent people to become willing participants in furthering violence against poor and marginalized people.

In their book, A.J. and Chris document many histories usually left out of social work, including communities of Black social workers (who, among other things, never removed children from their homes involuntarily), the role of early social workers in advancing eugenics and mass confinement, and the emergence of colonial education, psychiatry, and penitentiaries.”